House of the dead book review

house of the dead book review

Reviewed by Howard C. Davis; July 26, Brad Meltzer's new novel, The House of Secrets, revolves around a highly fictionalized Was she even dead?. Meeting Place of the Dead: A True Haunting and millions of other books are available for Amazon Kindle. . Story time just got better with Prime Book Box, a subscription that delivers hand-picked See all 17 customer reviews is an earnestly written description of an investigation of a haunted house in Ontario, Canada. Mir ist es relativ schwer gefallen, einen Einstieg in das Buch zu finden. Der Leser erfährt am Anfang nämlich nur bruchstückhaft, wovon das Buch handelt.

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House of the dead book review -

Zu den Zombies an sich erfährt man rein gar nichts. Ich hatte bisher nur ganz wenig von dem Manga gehört. Natürlich gibt es viele Zombie-Szenarien wo das nie thematisiert wird, was ja allein vom Setting her absolut verständlich ist. Sie haben keinen Kindle? The Dead - Canada.

I drank two cups of hot lemon tea, I followed short arcs sketched by listless eagles in the evening sky, I breathed in volumes of busy city smoke; but while leaving for home, as I turned on the ignition key of my bike, I caught hold of a loud, clear, distinct feeling.

It was so distinct that I did not know at first what it was trying to convey; that is to say, my natural thinking process had reverted to a background noise and I could only listen with attention to the wordless outwardly buzz around my ears and inside my chest, which seemed to be growing I stood motionless for a second or two, and then, a picture of a shop flashed inside the head.

I turned my head to find the same shop in the ground floor of that building. From across the street, it appeared to be a wholesaler's office, with its glass partition displaying drawing and craft notebooks, paper-thin local guides to health and fitness, bedroom life, and tourism in Rajasthan.

The store was large and largely empty. I caught their amazed disoriented gaze, but, to avoid any verbal distractions, I looked towards a shelf on my immediate right.

I was at once stunned. Dostoyevsky, Turgenev, Pasternak, Gibran With my mouth half open, I plugged out 10 titles, not once leafing through them, not once checking the blurb, and plopped the bulk on the owner's creaking desk.

He too was excited but he concealed it, and overcharged me. I did not cross-check the MRP nor did I request for a discount; he may have charged me even more and I would have happily emptied my wallet.

Such was my state! What did it matter which books I was buying, at what price and who from? The buzzing humming feeling had now enlarged and transmuted into a quietude donning my whole being — not the other way round.

I returned home after a short ride, but I was now proud for some reason and happy; the quietude only a memory, an object for analysis.

I dusted the books, and arranged them neatly on my desk, as if they were sacred idols I was going to worship every day. For 6 months I did not go to them: The books would change me somehow, I knew, and I wasn't too prepared to let go of whatever they may ask me to let go of.

No, not unless the sentries of my rational mind were welcoming and unsuspicious. And here now I am, reading, having read. Something indeed did happen.

But what exactly did the book do? So that my intellect does not become restless, I will give it a word to chew over and flaunt.

Not the same word Leo Tolstoy used for this work: The book purged me, emptied me, humbled me; cleaned me of the grime I had gathered over time. This book is sacred.

View all 23 comments. View all 15 comments. Por eso gritamos de noche. Dice en otra parte del libro: Otros, directamente no lograban sobrevivir a este suplicio.

View all 4 comments. The following years on the other hand are all mixed up together, and leave but a confused recollection.

Certain epochs of this life are even effaced from my memory. I have kept one general impression of it though, always the same; painful, monotonous, stifling.

What I saw in experience during the first few days of imprisonment seems to me as if it had all taken place yesterday. Suc "During the first weeks, and naturally the early part of my imprisonment, made a deep impression on my imagination.

Dostoyevsky completed this work six years after his release, and across its two main sections you can feel him organising his memories, vividly revising them, and struggling to get them down before they fade.

Under the circumstances, he did a remarkable job, after all, I am sure he would rather have written about something else, but his experiences are that important, he simply had to get it down on paper.

Few books give such a vivid picture of the sort of setting from which many great works of prison literature emerge, the power of certain writing done from prison has to do with the way it alternatively staves off and gives rein to restlessness, fervour, and desperation.

But the most dramatic such attempt in the novel is the shape of the narrative itself. Alexander Petrovich is a bit of a sloppy storyteller.

In a way, 'The House of the Dead is constantly at odds with its subject matter; wherever the narrative calls for a dreary roll call of routine tasks and daily humiliations, the book darts off, digresses or swerves to the side.

Which makes me ask the question, why didn't Dostoyevsky just write an out and out autobiographical account of his experience? To be fair, the book moves around genres really well, shifting fluidly between fiction, philosophical meditation, and memoir.

I was expecting something more hard-hitting, and emotionally draining from the reader's perspective, that would long live in the memory, but it fell short of this.

There are however, for Dostoyevsky fans plenty of lovely philosophical musings, where the narrator ponders the nature of freedom and the importance of hope, the inequality of punishments for the same crime, the gap between appearance and reality, the nature of free will, and other heavy themes.

To me, it was like standing just outside the prison gates getting a glimpse, rather than truly feeling the blood, sweat, and tears from within.

Very well written it's Dostoyevsky after all , just not entirely what I had hoped for. View all 11 comments.

What is our life but a prison? We are all imprisoned in an island. The world itself to some men is a prison, our narrow seas as so many ditches, and when they have compassed the globe of the earth, they would fain go see what is done in the moon.

This book and Dostoevsky's four years in Siberia are an obvious rough draf "What I have said of servitude, I again say of imprisonment, we are all prisoners.

Even without the early draft qualities of this novel, 'Notes from a Dead House' is a critical novel. Orange might be the new black, but the Big D was there first.

Both explore how prison impacts those who are sent there, the way people survive, the things that drive people mad inside, the things that are core about being human within an environment meant to limit the very essence of humanness, how punishment is relative, etc, and ad nauseam.

I think the brilliance of prison writing is the way it can be used as a microcosm of life. We are all trapped by something.

We are all controlled by something, tortured by someone, addicted to vice, sin, or our own fears. Exploring the idea of prison and prisoners can open us up to not just the difficulties we all face, but the way s we can survive life's fetters, our body's constraints, the darkness of this mortal coil.

Dostoevsky give us hints. Dreams, hope, faith, purpose and relationships all allowed him to survive his four years in Siberia. Those same characteristics increase the odds that not only will we survive our incarceration on this Earth, but we might even grow fond of it and find beauty and love in the process.

View all 3 comments. Dec 14, Sean rated it it was amazing Shelves: Prison Life in Siberia. It is a phrase synonymous with misery and suffering.

Just how bad was it in 19th century Siberia? My curiosity found this no Prison Life in Siberia. My curiosity found this novel irresistible.

I just had to find out what this lifestyle was in a bygone time in a country that has had a very troubled and complicated past. I was ready to enter the House of the Dead.

In , Fyodor Dostoyevsky was accused of reading and distributing several banned works of literature and subsequently sentenced to prison by the Russian government to four years hard labor in Siberia followed by mandatory military service.

During this time the writer experienced unendurable hardship. His experience of this period inspired him to write a work of fiction that brought this previously unknown world to light.

After his release from prison he penned a work that would become the first work that would describe in vivid detail the horrors of his four excruciatingly long years in the awful Siberian prison.

Dostoyevsky portrays a very realistic and expressive account of his earliest impressions of entering prison life.

The author touches upon many different aspects of life in the prison. He describes the work schedule, the food, the living conditions, the punishment, the sick hospital all with distinct detail.

It is unclear if any of the other prisoners described are based on actual convicts that Dostoyevsky knew during his incarceration.

However, he provides a very interesting account of the attitudes and behaviors of several characters who have adapted to life of punishment and isolation.

Overall, Dostoyevsky has written one of his most personal and realistic works that is definitely worth reading. It is among some of his shorter works and gets passed up for his four elephants, Crime and Punishment, Brothers Karamazov, The Idiot, and Demons.

However, this work should not be ignored. It has excellent writing and is recommended for anyone interested in this unusual and primitive world.

View all 7 comments. View all 5 comments. View all 6 comments. This intelligently written book was full of details taken from the actual Siberian prison experience of Dostoevsky himself.

It contained a fair amount of that deep psychological insight Dostoevsky is known for. His position as an outsider nobleman was often painful, and he described in detail how that loneliness wears on one.

This is the case though one is never actually physically alone in prison, which, as he points out, is another reason that kind of life is so hellish.

Also, his analyses of This intelligently written book was full of details taken from the actual Siberian prison experience of Dostoevsky himself.

Also, his analyses of his fellow prisoners were generally superb. In my opinion, one of the funniest descriptions in the book concerned a rather odd hospital patient: He did that for the whole week.

Another prisoner I enjoyed hearing about was Petrov. One tactic was to simulate the symptoms of syphilis by inserting finely chopped horse hair into tiny incisions on the penis.

The suppurations were enough to persuade all but the most experienced camp doctors that the convict was no longer fit for work. Alexander Solzhenitsyn famously wrote The Gulag Archipelago in order to bring to life the iniquities of the penal system under in the Soviet Union.

John Blow has forever lived in the shadow of Henry Purcell, his former student. Home About Contacts and Submissions. The Tsarist ministers who oversaw the system of punishment-and-exile may have had a vaguely positive general notion of it, but as Beer points out and illustrates ruthlessly, those good intentions were only faint echoes by the time they became camp reality: Beer sketches in dozens and dozens of quick biographies, giving glimpses whenever he can of the sordid day-to-day realities these prisoners experienced, including the lengths to which some of them would go in order dodge the vicious toil at the heart of their exile: Fearsome and meticulous study of the system of Siberian exile of the old Russian Empire, focusing on the period from the early 19th century to the empire's fall in The whole of Russia east of the Ural mountains, if it was separated and left to be its own country, would still be the largest single nation on earth.

As early as the 16th century, it was proposed that this vast hinterland, still populated by native tribes and a few fur trappers, would serve as a useful dumping ground for the cr Fearsome and meticulous study of the system of Siberian exile of the old Russian Empire, focusing on the period from the early 19th century to the empire's fall in As early as the 16th century, it was proposed that this vast hinterland, still populated by native tribes and a few fur trappers, would serve as a useful dumping ground for the criminal elements that contaminated holy Russia.

In theory, it would be a mixture between colonization and imprisonment, where hard labor would be a reformative agent, producing hardy settlers, farmers, loyal subjects of the empire.

It was not so. Siberia was transformed into a vast, open air prison, either oppressively brutal or unable to control its vast population of convicts, who would often escape and roam the countryside.

No matter if the prisoner was a 'vagrant' serf who ran away or a political criminal, they would all become exposed to criminality and the casual violence Dostoyevsky makes clear in his own autobiographical novel, for which this book is named.

Well before the Trans-Siberian Railroad was completed in the s, the prisoners were force-marched along the thousands of miles to the vast frontier, often sobbing as they passed the boundary marker along the Urals.

Beer's study is broad in its citations of literary accounts and government archives. But he also cites news outlets and journals who howled in indignation at the prisoners' treatment, governmental archives, and prisoners' own testimonies.

He even finds reports from the American explorer George Kennan, a distant relation to the American diplomat who argued for 'containment'. Beer's study follows waves of exiles - the foolhardy idealism of the Decembrists, Polish nationalists, petty criminals, and later revolutionaries.

The grand irony of the Siberian system is that far from being a quarantine, it served only to incubate later revolutions.

They, too, would see Siberia as a place both to settle, to exploit, and to dispose of human lives by the thousands.

I feel so accomplished for finishing this book, which took me an unusually long time 1 week to read because it was so packed with information.

Most of it was very interesting, but it could FEEL like a slog on occasion. Jan 06, Marks54 rated it really liked it. I first heard about this book while reading a couple of histories about the Romanov dynasty and its end in WWI and the Russian Revolutions of This is a book about the Romanov system of internal exile to Siberia, especially from until the beginning of WW1.

Beer takes his title from Dostoevsky's autobiographical novel of his time in Siberian prisons. In terms of sources, Beer makes good use of a vast array of source materials that have been made available in Russia in recent decades.

Th I first heard about this book while reading a couple of histories about the Romanov dynasty and its end in WWI and the Russian Revolutions of The book thus constitutes a general history of the exile program in its last century.

For those who do not realize the continuity between the Tsarist prisons and the Gulag, readers might with to follow this book up with Anne Applebaum's superb history of the Gulag that was published a few years ago or Wachsmann's book on the Nazi concentration camp system.

The book is generally well written and interesting, but the topic is a grim one. How to hold the reader through over a hundred years of brutality and grimness is no mean feat.

The first is the experiences of the Decembrists which is a highlight of the book. Later chapters focus on subsequent generations of exiles and how their experiences changed, including revolutionary periods after , the Polish rebellion of , the rebirth of revolutionary and anarchist movements in the s and s, the revolution of , and the events leading up to Beer does discuss the continuity with the Bolshevik system, but that is really another story.

Beer also makes good use of the accounts of some of the more famous visitors to Siberia, in particular Dostoevsky and Chekhov, who provided detailed notes of his visit to Sakhalin Island.

It is hard to miss when making use of observers like that. Several themes are noteworthy in the book. A related issue is the role of technology and evolving media, which made Siberia less remote and more connected and thus made the Siberian system seem anachronistic and helped to alienate the educated classes both in Russia and in Europe and America.

Perhaps the major theme is the corruption inherent in the foundation of the system of autocratic control and which was made much worse but the extended bureaucratic nature of the Tsarist regime.

Beer is most effective in showing how the system not only failed to stem political unrest and revolution but actually ended up serving as a laboratory for revolution that provided training, hardening, and stature for the Bolsheviks.

It is really fascinating to read this with the internet handy. Beer makes a number a points by referencing paintings from the period that diepict the plight of the exiles or by discussing the particular towns in which various exiles served their time.

The paintings can be looked up on the web. You can even book a trip on the Trans-Siberian Railroad or see a trip advisor page for where Lenin was exiled.

There are still only a few sights to see there. Overall, this was a good book and a fine supporting history for the Romanovs. Apr 10, Cheyanne rated it it was amazing.

I think this would be a good read even if you aren't a Russian history buff like me. If you are, it's amazing. The author has synthesized a massive amount of historical research into an epic account of centuries of exile and suffering in the great "prison without a roof.

Some, such as the Decembrists and Dostoevsky, are famous; others might have been forg I think this would be a good read even if you aren't a Russian history buff like me.

Some, such as the Decembrists and Dostoevsky, are famous; others might have been forgotten but for the diaries and letters they managed to leave behind to fill a history such as this one.

Nov 16, Colby rated it it was amazing Shelves: Simply, a masterpiece of 'forensic scholarship'. No point in regurgitating summaries posted; words fail - at least, my words fail.

Yet another case of [human] 'good intentions' producing [human] unintended consequences, but on a tragically huge scale.

I've read 'The Idiot', a surprisingly humorous book, even if it is a grim humor, Dostoevsky is an author deserving of his accolades.

I've just ordered Tolstoy's Resurrection another book frequently referred. The brutality never ends - this sentence by Beer paraphrased sums it up, 'By the end of the nineteenth century, Imperial Russia was a society well written, exhaustively researched I am a worthy judge of that?

The brutality never ends - this sentence by Beer paraphrased sums it up, 'By the end of the nineteenth century, Imperial Russia was a society devouring itself'.

Knowing that Stalin took the gulags and the expediency of "devouring" his own people to a whole new level, with his victims numbering in the millions, not just in the hundreds of thousands - makes the pages heavy reading.

Maybe the Russians learned cruelty only too well from their years of oppression under the Mongols. Then again, most every culture that remains on earth has a history of barbarity.

Scratch the surface and find a blood lust that still remains. Of our own sordid past, ours is a country conceived in slavery, a government predicted on the God-given right of white people to own black people.

And to this day that overt racism persists as strong as ever even if deodorized. Which brings up another observation forwarded by Beer, 'reform only happens when backed by the threat of violence'.

I am becoming ever more convinced of that grim truth. The tsar's ideology - 1 Autocracy is this where we are heading, the strongman style of government?

The Russian tsars used it with gusto. To be arrested was to be guilty. Our Godly people know how well it works in hunting witches.

There's much more - the whole bit about General Cuckoo's Army, i. The tsar felt constrained in the handling of young revolutionaries from the nobility - so he let them live and then - from the remote settlements of Siberia they built a fanatical base for revolution.

Stalin did not have to deal with such qualms. Full circle - back to the gentle mercies of Genghis Khan. The exiles were marched in chains over 1, miles - usually may more than 1, This occurred at roughly the same time as coffles of African slaves were being forced marched from the east coast seaports to the southern cotton fields, at roughly the same distance.

We needn't point fingers as much as look in the mirror. The state's primary interest was with political prisoners, the peasants had to deal with violent criminals as best they could.

Oftentimes the hard working settlers were on their own. Siberia at the end of the nineteenth century was in a virtual civil war. The escaped exiles and vagabonds would gang up and terrorize the isolated farms and villages.

Arson was a common weapon. Oct 06, Lauren Albert rated it it was amazing Shelves: A very good look at exile to Siberia under the Tsars. He briefly discusses Siberia after the revolution but I did wonder if he's planning a book about it.

It's not as easy a subject as I imagined--There was not one kind of exile and there was not one kind of person exiled. Different classes often though not always got treated differently for example.

People were also differentiated by what part of Siberia they were sent to--climate and labor being the main differentiators.

Aber eine Begründung, wieso, weshalb, warum. Semeya riskiert Kopf und Kragen um das Versprechen zu halten, seine Schülerin zu beschützen. Wenn ich die Box im Abo für ein Jahr bestelle, muss But another young woman went missing from the area a few years back, and DC Fiona Griffiths soon suspects a crime even more chilling than she first imagined. Ich finde die Kritik eigentlich recht logisch und nachvollziehbar, abgesehen von dem seltsamen vergleich zu Highschool of the Dead, einen Manga den ich viiiiiiiiiel viiiiiiiiiiiiiiiel viiiiiiiiiiiiel…. I am the dark. Sie haben keinen Kindle? Conspiracy theorists believe the culprit was Kaitlin Johnson. Like what we do? I just finished Book 5 in this series and am now anxious for publication of Book 6. Ich liebe Zombie Szenarien, völlig egal ob als Serie, Film, Anime oder Manga aber dadurch, dass ich bisher schon so einiges konsumiert habe, bot sich mir hier nichts neues. Mehr ist es in meinen Augen aber nicht. It seems, too, that he was chasing a lost Bible that once belonged to the traitor Benedict Arnold. Weitere Informationen finden Sie auf unserer Seite der Datenschutzbestimmungen.

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Die Farbseiten in jedem Band sind ein wunderschöner Zusatz. She's wearing nothing but a thin, white dress. Wenn du diesen Blog weiter nutzt, stimmst du der Verwendung von Cookies zu. My impulse on completing this compelling read was to run to author Bingham's next public appearance so that I might hug him in a display of pure gratitude. My only complaints hardly worth a mention are that I could do with a little less self-medicating with cannabis and fewer F-bombs. Because of its far greater scale and brutality, the Soviet gulag has eclipsed the memory of the Tsarist penal system in the popular imagination. This is one of my very favorite series, and one that I buy the new books as soon as they're available -- that's unusual for me. Seite 1 von 1 Zum Anfang Seite 1 von 1. It's an odd piece of work: It was known as 'the vast prison without a roof'. The concept of a " celluloid axis " between Japan and Germany nicely prefigures the later political-military Axis and among Kracht's nice subtle touches is the small nod to the third Axis power, having the Germans whisper to Nägeli that, as far Beste Spielothek in Rollesbroich finden the funds for the film go: Unterstütze uns Hier erfahrt ihr, wie ihr uns ansonsten unterstützen könnt. Tor marwin hitz haben keinen Kindle? Talking to the Dead 2. Over the nineteenth century, however, these political exiles transformed Siberia's mines, prisons and remote settlements into an enormous laboratory of revolution. Bresson, Vigo, Dovzhenko, Ozu, and he himself.

But there were positives. Under the tsars and even under Stalin, the indigenous population of Siberia suffered little, once the 18th-century depredations by Cossacks stopped.

Yakuts and Buryats flourished and multiplied: Even before the Trans-Siberian railway belatedly provided Siberia with its spinal column, its cities, such as Tomsk with its university, and Irkutsk with its prosperous merchants, were widely admired.

Siberia was advanced enough to export butter to the UK before the first world war: Tsarist rule seems worse than that of other European empires because it perpetrated its horrors at home: Western Europe sent surplus peasants to colonies, where the immigrants exterminated the natives.

Today, for every million people in Russia, there are 4, The House of the Dead no longer seems so bad. The House of the Dead is published by Allen Unwin.

The suppurations were enough to persuade all but the most experienced camp doctors that the convict was no longer fit for work.

Alexander Solzhenitsyn famously wrote The Gulag Archipelago in order to bring to life the iniquities of the penal system under in the Soviet Union.

John Blow has forever lived in the shadow of Henry Purcell, his former student. Home About Contacts and Submissions.

The Tsarist ministers who oversaw the system of punishment-and-exile may have had a vaguely positive general notion of it, but as Beer points out and illustrates ruthlessly, those good intentions were only faint echoes by the time they became camp reality: Beer sketches in dozens and dozens of quick biographies, giving glimpses whenever he can of the sordid day-to-day realities these prisoners experienced, including the lengths to which some of them would go in order dodge the vicious toil at the heart of their exile: I always remember a phrase regarding Joyce: I mean — we learn about dark magic and how the teens get sucked into it, sort of.

I mean, I guess it was interesting how none of the kids had a healthy dose of skepticism. Or, I would probably react more like the video below.

Suffice to say — given my personality style, it just was hard for me to really get into the fear atmosphere of this book, too much of my time was spent eye rolling.

I read this page book in essentially two days. She works for a non-profit. April always has a book on hand.

In her free time she can be found binge watching The Office with her husband and baby, spending way too much time on Pinterest or exploring her neighborhood.

Notify me of follow-up comments by email. Notify me of new posts by email. This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

One tactic was to simulate the symptoms of syphilis by inserting finely chopped horse hair into tiny incisions on the penis. Well, Beer read him hoping to find more handball em norwegen kroatien on poker texas holdem wertigkeit theme. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Jan 27, Kusaimamekirai rated it really liked it. Daniel Beer's new book, The House of the Deadbrings to life both the brutal realities of an inhuman system and the tragic and inspiring f It was known as 'the vast prison Bridesmaids Slot Machine Online ᐈ Microgaming™ Casino Slots a roof'. Those who like prison stories. Dostoevsky did spend four years in one of the Gulags, and it was only by the grace of the ruling Czar texas holdem casino table rules he was allowed spielde return. Undoubtedly — as shown by his chapter on hordes of vagabonds robbing and murdering their way back to European Russia — being a dump for convicts harmed Siberia, as it did New South Wales. Wta australian open 2019 his wife and brother ungarn news and merkury casino online was burdened with debts. Peering through the crevices in the palisade in the hope of glimpsing something, one sees nothing but a little corner of the sky, and a high earthwork covered with the long grass of the steppe. View all 15 comments. Loading comments… Trouble loading? It was also necessary to extract from his wounds the splinters of the rods which had been broken on his back.

House Of The Dead Book Review Video

The House of the Dead: Overkill Review The House of Lost Souls F. I found Ari to be kalixa mastercard erfahrungen pretty intriguing character and while I wasn't really feeling Naida at first, she grew on me. In a saga spanning four hundred years and two continents, Satan and his coven of witches are determined to reclaim the tortured community and establish a Hell on Earth. David Aaronovitch The Times In many ways Slots games titan truly was a House of the Dead - as Daniel Beer, who borrows the title of Spielbank garmisch Dostoevsky's prison novel for his neu online casino new study, recounts in Big Prosperity Slot Machine - Play Online or on Mobile Now and gripping detail. Es geht einfach etwas zu schnell und wirkt dadurch unglaubwürdig. FBI agent, Trevor Rabkin informs the siblings that while Jack had been openly filming TV episodes in places wuestenfuchs Egypt, Iran, Russia, and Cuba, he had been doing something else in the shadows at the behest of the government. Kunden, die diesen Artikel angesehen haben, haben auch angesehen. Meanwhile, the reader gets to know Kaitlyn and Carly through online casino 2019 bonus ohne einzahlung entries and Post-It Note exchanges since they can't occupy the body at the same time, this is the only way they know to communicate with each other until one enjoy games Carly's notes to Kaitlyn just stop and Kaitlyn has to figure out what happened. It's an odd piece of work: So I'm going to do you all a favour and stop and give you a piece of advice instead.

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